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Strengthen your knees to help manage osteoarthritis pain.

9 Tricks for Getting Motivated to Exercise

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Start Off Small

#1 - Start off small

Rome wasn’t built in a day. Neither is a strong body. Start with a walk to the corner and back, or five minutes with an exercise video. Praise yourself for getting started — and then keep the momentum going. Gradually add a little to the time and/or intensity with which you exercise.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Break It Up

#2 - Break it up

If 30 minutes of exercise a day is daunting, try breaking it up into three 10-minute sessions. You’ll still reap the benefits.

#3 - Keep it fresh

If the same exercise day after day leaves you bored, try varying your activities. When walking, take different routes through your own neighborhood or alternate with walks in other neighborhoods that have wide, level sidewalks. Or go to a nearby park or mall.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Find What You Like

#4 - Find what you like

Exercise can be fun if you’re doing what you enjoy — tossing a ball with your children or grandchildren, working in your garden, playing in the pool or going to the zoo. When your favorite leisure activities are also good exercise, be sure to plan more of them.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Be Flexible

#5 - Be flexible

People who adjust their exercise routine to accommodate their osteoarthritis are more likely to keep exercising than those who don’t. Avoid an all-or-nothing mentality. If your knees hurt, resolve to walk more slowly and avoid hills. If you’re stiff in the morning, then exercise in the evening.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Don't Go It Alone

#6 - Don’t go it alone

Knowing that a friend is waiting on your doorstep or meeting you at the gym creates an obligation. Find someone who shares your goals, then encourage each other. Look forward to your dates to exercise.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Soothe Yourself

#7 - Soothe yourself

If fear of pain makes you anxious about exercising, you may give up too soon. Take time to warm up and stretch before you start. Breathe deeply when working out. Practice a little positive self-talk. For example, “I can do this, and I’ll be stronger and more confident after I do.”

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Use Rewards

#8 - Use a reward system

When you reach a milestone in your newly adopted plan — say, you’ve consistently exercised three times a week for a month — treat yourself to a night out at the movies or some new music for your MP3 player. When you make major milestones, up the indulgence factor by going for a spa treatment or buying tickets to see your favorite team in action.

Knee Exercise - Tricks to Help Get Motivated - Know Your Goal

#9 - Know your goal

It’s easier to keep exercising if you’re working toward a goal. Imagine a moment in the future — crossing the finish line at the Arthritis Foundation’s 3K Arthritis Walk event, dancing at your daughter’s wedding or just bending to tie your shoes without serious strain.

Read next article

Regular exercise provides many benefits — including less osteoarthritis knee pain and more energy to do the things that are important to you. Yet knowing exercise is good for you and actually doing it are two different things, and it can be hard to get going when your schedule is jam-packed and your joints are begging for a little rest and relaxation. So how do you get yourself going and keep yourself motivated?

 

PLEASE NOTE: This article is adapted from Arthritis Today®, the health magazine published by the Arthritis Foundation® and is presented for informational purposes only. This information is not meant to take the place of the advice of your doctor. By providing you with this information, Sanofi Biosurgery is not endorsing its content nor does it represent that the information is necessarily appropriate for you. You should consult with your doctor before starting any new health or exercise regimen.

The views presented herein are solely those of Arthritis Today and their publisher the Arthritis Foundation. Sanofi Biosurgery does not have any input in, or editorial control over Arthritis Today and is not responsible for its content. Arthritis Today is a registered trademark of the Arthritis Foundation.

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Indication

Synvisc-One® (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Important Safety Information for Synvisc-One

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Allergic reactions, some which can be potentially severe, have been reported during the use of Synvisc-One. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, and should be used with caution when there is swelling of the legs due to problems with venous stasis or lymphatic drainage.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (<2% each): pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid build-up in or around the knee. Tell your doctor if you experience any side effects after treatment with Synvisc-One.

 

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One

 

Indication

SYNVISC® (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Important Safety Information for SYNVISC

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds - such as feathers, eggs or poultry - or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC

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Important Safety Information: SYNVISC and Synvisc-One are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hyaluronan products or patients with infections in or around the target knee.