For U.S. Residents Only Synvisc-One

Strengthen your knees to help manage osteoarthritis pain.

Good Things Come to Those Who Weight Train

Biceps curls and leg presses do more than pump up your physique. By building muscle, strength training helps you stay strong and get around better. But that’s not all. A medical study (Arthritis Care and Research, October 15, 2006) suggests that lower-body strengthening exercises may slow the progression of knee osteoarthritis.

Strong evidence

The study by researchers at Indiana University included 221 older adults, some of whom had knee pain and/or X-ray evidence of knee osteoarthritis. These older adults were randomly assigned to do either strength training or flexibility exercise. They began by working out at a gym twice a week and at home once a week. Over the course of a year, the gym sessions were gradually phased out until all workouts were done at home. For those in the strength-training group, that meant transitioning from weight machines at the gym to home exercises with elastic bands.

Strength was measured and knee X-rays were taken at the beginning of the study and 30 months later. The strength-training group retained more strength during this period than the flexibility exercise group did. That’s no surprise. Perhaps more interestingly, among those who had osteoarthritis when the study started, the progression of joint space narrowing — a sign that their arthritis was getting worse — also occurred less often in the group who strength trained. 

Strength training 101

Strengthening exercises use weights or resistance to make your muscles work harder, which helps them grow stronger. The latest expert guidelines recommend strength training two or three times a week. To give your muscles a chance to recover, rest at least one day between workouts.

You can do strength training using weight machines, free weights or stretchy bands, cords or tubes that offer resistance when you pull on them. In addition, some classic strengthening exercises — such as push-ups, pull-ups and crunches — use the weight of your own body to work your muscles. Ask your doctor which forms of strength training are best for you and whether there are any specific moves you should avoid. Also, consider working with a personal trainer for at least a few sessions to make sure your exercise form is correct.

The bottom line

Strength training has many proven health benefits. Strong muscles absorb shocks and reduce the strain on joints, which helps protect your joints from injury. In addition, strength training helps build strong bones as well as improve physical functioning.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, strengthening exercises can be safe and effective for people of all ages with many types of health challenges. In fact, people with health concerns such as arthritis often have the most to gain from getting stronger.

PLEASE NOTE: The studies and their findings that are presented in this article are for informational purposes only and are not meant to take the place of the advice of your doctor. By providing you with this information, Sanofi Biosurgery is not endorsing its content nor does it represent that the information is necessarily appropriate for you. You should consult with your doctor before starting any new health or exercise regimen.

References

"Effects of Strength Training on the Incidence and Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis.” A.E. Mikesky et al. Arthritis Care and Research. October 15, 2006, vol. 55, no. 5, pp. 690-699.

"Weight Training Does Not Increase Strength But May Slow Progression in OA Patients.” John Wiley & Sons (news release), September 29, 2006.

"Growing stronger: strength training for older adults — frequently asked questions.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/growingstronger/faq/index.html. Accessed September 6, 2011.

"Strength training: getting stronger, leaner and healthier.” Mayo Clinic. Available at: >http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/strength-training/HQ01710. Accessed September 6, 2011.

"Growing stronger: Strength training for older adults — why strength train?” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/growingstronger/why/index.html. Accessed September 6, 2011.

"Physical activity and weight control.” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/physical.htm. Accessed September 6, 2011.

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Indication

Synvisc-One® (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Important Safety Information for Synvisc-One

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Allergic reactions, some which can be potentially severe, have been reported during the use of Synvisc-One. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, and should be used with caution when there is swelling of the legs due to problems with venous stasis or lymphatic drainage.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (<2% each): pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid build-up in or around the knee. Tell your doctor if you experience any side effects after treatment with Synvisc-One.

 

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One

 

Indication

SYNVISC® (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Important Safety Information for SYNVISC

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds - such as feathers, eggs or poultry - or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC

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Important Safety Information: SYNVISC and Synvisc-One are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hyaluronan products or patients with infections in or around the target knee.