For U.S. Residents Only Synvisc-One

Strengthen your knees to help manage osteoarthritis pain.

Make a Splash with Water Workouts

Looking for a way to liven up your exercise routine? Try leaving dry land. A warm pool is the ideal environment for soothing stiff knee joints aching from osteoarthritis. The buoyancy of the water helps support your joints, making it easier to move them freely. Water also offers resistance for muscles to work against, helping them get stronger and providing great knee support. Meanwhile, the warmth of the water causes blood vessels to dilate, increasing circulation.

Everybody into the pool

Water exercise has long been a favorite of people with arthritis and osteoarthritis. A study by British researchers bears out the benefits of taking your workouts waterborne (Health Technology Assessment, August 2005). The study included 312 adults with knee or hip osteoarthritis, about half of whom were randomly selected to take part in a water exercise program.

The water exercise classes were held twice a week for a year. Each hour-long class started with a warm-up, followed by exercises and/or swimming to improve strength, range of motion, flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, balance and coordination. The result: Water exercise over the course of a year resulted in a modest reduction in osteoarthritis pain and improved physical function.

After the study ended, people could continue the classes at their own cost, but fewer than one in five kept it up for the next six months. The improvements in pain generally disappeared during this period. This highlights the importance of continuing to exercise in order to maintain the benefits.

Come on in, the water’s fine

Water exercise is best done in water that is comfortably warm, not hot. The Arthritis Foundation® recommends a water temperature of 83° to 88° F. When you first get into the pool, take a few minutes to savor the soothing effect of the water. Once your muscles and joints feel more relaxed and comfortable, you’re ready to begin your workout.

Almost anyone can take part in water exercise. You might do something as simple as walking in waist-high or deeper water while swinging your arms. Or you might perform various strength moves using special equipment, such as webbed gloves, foam barbells, kickboards and water noodles. In addition, you may do some flexibility moves, made easier by the warmth and buoyancy of the water.

To learn how to exercise safely and effectively in the water, consider signing up for a class. In addition to getting expert instruction, you’ll enjoy the camaraderie of the group. Exercising in a group provides emotional support and helps relieve the feelings of depression and isolation that some people with arthritis experience. Just make sure your instructor is familiar with the special needs that go along with having osteoarthritis.

The bottom line

Water exercise is a low-impact activity that takes the weight off your joints, bones and muscles while you work them out. One good bet for finding a knowledgeable instructor is the Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Program, offered at many community and YMCA pools across the United States. In addition to teaching the basics of water exercise, some facilities also offer advanced-level courses. To find out what’s available in your area, visit www.arthritis.org.

 

PLEASE NOTE: This article is adapted from Arthritis Today®, the health magazine published by the Arthritis Foundation® and is presented for informational purposes only. This information is not meant to take the place of the advice of your doctor. By providing you with this information, Sanofi Biosurgery is not endorsing its content nor does it represent that the information is necessarily appropriate for you. You should consult with your doctor before starting any new health or exercise regimen.

The views presented herein are solely those of Arthritis Today and their publisher the Arthritis Foundation. Sanofi Biosurgery does not have any input in, or editorial control over Arthritis Today and is not responsible for its content. Arthritis Today is a registered trademark of the Arthritis Foundation.

References

“Water Exercise.” Arthritis Foundation. Available at: http://www.arthritis.org/water-exercise.php. Accessed September 6, 2011.

“Randomized Controlled Trial of the Cost-Effectiveness of Water-Based Therapy for Lower Limb Osteoarthritis.” T. Cochrane et al. Health Technology Assessment. August 2005, vol. 9, no. 31, Executive Summary.

“Slide show: Aquatic exercise how to’s.” Mayo Clinic. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/aquatic-exercise/SM00055. Accessed September 6, 2011.

“Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Program.” Arthritis Foundation. Available at: http://www.arthritis.org/aquatic-program.php. Accessed September 6, 2011.

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Indication

Synvisc-One® (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Important Safety Information for Synvisc-One

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Allergic reactions, some which can be potentially severe, have been reported during the use of Synvisc-One. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, and should be used with caution when there is swelling of the legs due to problems with venous stasis or lymphatic drainage.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (<2% each): pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid build-up in or around the knee. Tell your doctor if you experience any side effects after treatment with Synvisc-One.

 

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One

Indication

SYNVISC® (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Important Safety Information for SYNVISC

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds - such as feathers, eggs or poultry - or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC

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Important Safety Information: SYNVISC and Synvisc-One are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hyaluronan products or patients with infections in or around the target knee.