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Maintain a healthy weight to help reduce strain (and pain) in your knees.

4 Foods that May Help Fight Knee Osteoarthritis

Foods that May Help Fight Knee Osteoarthritis - Almonds

#1 - Almonds

Vitamin E is known for its strong antioxidant powers. A study (International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases, 2009) compared the knees of 42 people undergoing knee surgery: 32 with severe osteoarthritis and 10 with non-arthritis injuries. Researchers found less vitamin E in the knees of the osteoarthritis patients, implying that they were getting less of the vitamin’s protective benefits. Almonds, sunflower seeds and oil, safflower oil, hazelnuts, peanuts and spinach are all excellent sources of vitamin E. 

Foods that May Help Fight Knee Osteoarthritis - Salmon

#2 - Salmon

Vitamin D is found in cells throughout the body. A study (Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, 2009) of 1,248 people age 55 and older looked at how their knee health changed over a period of about seven years. Those with a low amount of vitamin D in their diet were at increased risk for worsening knee osteoarthritis. Fatty fish — such as salmon, tuna and mackerel — are good sources of this vitamin. It’s also added to vitamin D fortified milk, yogurt, orange juice and cereal.

 

Foods that May Help Fight Knee Osteoarthritis - Oranges

#3 - Oranges

Vitamin C is well known as an essential nutrient. One study (Arthritis Research and Therapy, 2007) looked at 293 healthy, middle-aged adults. Knee MRIs performed 10 years apart showed that people who reported consuming less vitamin C had more change in their leg bones — thought to be a precursor to the cartilage loss that marks knee osteoarthritis. Oranges, bell peppers, grapefruit, strawberries and broccoli all contain vitamin C.
Foods that May Help Fight Knee Osteoarthritis - Spinach

#4 - Spinach

Vitamin K may not get as much attention, but some research indicates that lack of sufficient vitamin K may contribute to osteoarthritis of the knee. In one study (Journal of Orthopaedic Science, 2009), a low intake of vitamin K was associated with a greater risk of knee osteoarthritis in 719 people age 60 and older. Green leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, kale, turnip and mustard greens, collards and Swiss chard are high in this vitamin.

Read next article

While there are plenty of reasons to include more nutritious foods in your diet — to feel your best, to help maintain a healthy weight — some foods contain antioxidants that are beneficial for knee osteoarthritis. The following vitamins have been studied for their relationship to osteoarthritis of the knee, and the results indicate that the foods you eat can make a difference for both your knees and your body.

 

PLEASE NOTE: The studies and their findings that are presented in this article are for informational purposes only and are not meant to take the place of the advice of your doctor. By providing you with this information, Sanofi Biosurgery is not endorsing its content nor does it represent that the information is necessarily appropriate for you. You should consult with your doctor before starting any new health or exercise regimen.

References

“Association of Low Dietary Vitamin K Intake With Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis in the Japanese Elderly Population: Dietary Survey in a Population-Based Cohort of the ROAD Study.” H. Oka et al. Journal of Orthopaedic Science. 2009, vol. 14, pp. 687-692.

“Effect of Antioxidants on Knee Cartilage and Bone in Healthy, Middle-Aged Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Study.” Y. Wang et al. Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2007, vol. 9, art. R66.

“Lipid Peroxidation, Glutathione, Vitamin E, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Synovial Fluid From Patients With Osteoarthritis.” W. Sutipornpalangkul et al. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases. 2009, vol. 12, pp. 324-328.

“Low Vitamin K Status Is Associated With Osteoarthritis in the Hand and Knee.” T. Neogi et al. Arthritis & Rheumatism. 2006, vol. 54, pp. 1255-1261.

“Serum Levels of Vitamin D, Sunlight Exposure, and Knee Cartilage Loss in Older Adults: The Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort Study.” C. Ding et al. Arthritis & Rheumatism. 2009, vol. 60, pp. 1381-1389.

“Vitamin D Status, Bone Mineral Density, and the Development of Radiographic Osteoarthritis of the Knee: The Rotterdam Study.” A.P. Bergink et al. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. 2009, vol. 15, pp. 230-237.


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Indication

Synvisc-One® (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Important Safety Information for Synvisc-One

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (<2% each): pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid build-up in or around the knee. Tell your doctor if you experience any side effects after treatment with Synvisc-One.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One (PDF)

Indication

SYNVISC® (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Important Safety Information for SYNVISC

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds - such as feathers, eggs or poultry - or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC (PDF)

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Important Safety Information: SYNVISC and Synvisc-One are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hyaluronan products or patients with infections in or around the target knee.