For U.S. Residents Only Synvisc-One

Maintain a healthy weight to help reduce strain (and pain) in your knees.

Nutrition News: Can You Eat to Beat Arthritis?

Could your food choices have an effect on your knee osteoarthritis? A review of the published scientific research (Arthritis Research and Therapy, 2006) found 18 food compounds or dietary supplements that had been shown to decrease osteoarthritis symptoms in at least one randomized controlled study.

But the scientific study of specific food components to prevent or treat arthritis is still relatively new, and the research was too weak or contradictory for firm conclusions to be drawn.


 

Food for thought

The review authors found 53 randomized controlled studies — a high standard in medical research — that looked at various food compounds and dietary supplements in people with osteoarthritis. Then they calculated the strength of the evidence for each compound or supplement. Only one met the criteria for “good” evidence: a mixture of avocado and soybean oil, also known as avocado/soybean unsaponifiables (ASU). Sold as a supplement in the United States, ASU is available in France as a prescription treatment for osteoarthritis. Well-controlled studies have suggested that ASU may reduce osteoarthritis pain and might slow down narrowing of joint space, a sign that arthritis is getting worse.

The review authors also found “moderate” evidence for methylsulfonylmethane, a sulfur compound found in fruits, corn, tomatoes, tea, coffee and milk. Overall, they concluded that certain food compounds may help relieve osteoarthritis symptoms, but it’s less clear whether such compounds also might slow down the disease’s progression.

Healthy appetites

More research is needed before scientists can say whether certain food compounds and dietary supplements might be useful for managing osteoarthritis. In the meantime, experts agree that people with osteoarthritis — like everyone else — can benefit from eating a diet that promotes better health and weight control. A healthful diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and limits saturated and trans fats, added sugars and salt. Other smart choices include fish, beans, nuts, lean meats, skinless poultry and fat-free or low-fat dairy products.

If you choose to use dietary supplements, be aware that some may have unwanted side effects or interact harmfully with certain medications. Also, in the United States, supplements aren’t required to be standardized, so it’s not easy to know exactly what you’re getting. Before taking a supplement, talk to your doctor to make sure it’s appropriate for you.

The bottom line

Researchers are just starting to explore the food-osteoarthritis connection. The role played by specific food compounds is still uncertain. But when it comes to diet in general, it’s clear that you really are what you eat — and healthful food choices make for a healthier body.

PLEASE NOTE: The studies and their findings that are presented in this article are for informational purposes only and are not meant to take the place of the advice of your doctor. By providing you with this information, Sanofi Biosurgery is not endorsing its content nor does it represent that the information is necessarily appropriate for you. You should consult with your doctor before starting any new health or exercise regimen.

References

“Osteoarthritis and Nutrition. From Nutraceuticals to Functional Foods: A Systematic Review of the Scientific Evidence.” L.G. Ameye and W.S.S. Chee. Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2006, vol. 8, no. 4, article R127.

“Alternative Treatments for Arthritis: An A to Z Guide.” D. Foltz-Gray. Atlanta, GA: Arthritis Foundation, 2005.

“Dietary Supplements: Background Information.” National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Available at: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/DietarySupplements.asp. Accessed September 6, 2011.

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Indication

Synvisc-One® (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Important Safety Information for Synvisc-One

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Allergic reactions, some which can be potentially severe, have been reported during the use of Synvisc-One. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, and should be used with caution when there is swelling of the legs due to problems with venous stasis or lymphatic drainage.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (<2% each): pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid build-up in or around the knee. Tell your doctor if you experience any side effects after treatment with Synvisc-One.

 

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One

 

Indication

SYNVISC® (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Important Safety Information for SYNVISC

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds - such as feathers, eggs or poultry - or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (≤21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC

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Important Safety Information: SYNVISC and Synvisc-One are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hyaluronan products or patients with infections in or around the target knee.